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 How much of the bullet has to be in the case?
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Hublocker
Junior Member

Canada
51 Posts

Posted - May 23 2012 :  15:36:20  Show Profile Send Hublocker a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A very good buddy of mine gave me a a Husqvarna 7x57 rifle. He said it had a very long throat and he had to load bullets "hanging by their toenails" to shoot accurately.

He gave me some examples of good loads he had with Hornady SST bullets and they have 5/32nds of an inch of bullet below the cannelure exposed.

The 150 grain Hornandy interlocks only have 9/32 of an inch from the cannelure to the base of the bullet. If I loaded to that same seating I would only have 1/8 of an inch of bullet in the case.

Is that acceptable?

How much depth is usually considered necessary?

The point is kind of moot anyway because my little Lee Classic Loader kit doesn't have enough threads to load that long anyway.

ranger335v
Advanced Member

1633 Posts

Posted - May 23 2012 :  16:53:05  Show Profile Send ranger335v a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The old adage to seat "one caliber deep" is a myth; it started in black powder days but many smokeless cartridges don't have necks one caliber long. So, I suppose anything that does't fall out is "acceptable" but I doubt it would be neccessary to seat anything by the "toe nails" to obtain good accuracy.

- Common sense is an uncommon quality -

Edited by - ranger335v on May 23 2012 16:54:03
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curly
Moderator



Canada
3014 Posts

Posted - May 23 2012 :  20:37:10  Show Profile Send curly a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Try Barnes TSX bullets.....solid copper instead of lead results in long-for-caliber bullets for any given weight....In addition, the Barnes TSX bullet has a reputation for preferring a jump before engaging the lands to acheive the best accuracy, so you might walk away with the best of both worlds....

Just my two cents...

Curly
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Joe King
Senior Member



USA
481 Posts

Posted - May 23 2012 :  21:19:29  Show Profile Send Joe King a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My 2 most accurate rifles are both freebored (long throat), so I don't even bother to load either to touch the lands unless it's with an extremely long bullet (7mm 162 gr Amax). My 22-250 has a jump of about 0.1+-, Iv'e never had an issue getting good groups with it. So more to the point of your question, seat em deep enough that your comfortable that the bullet won't get pushed out of being concentric, about 60% of cal keeps me feeling warm and fuzzy inside. Bear in mind that accuracy is consistency, consistency comes from attention to the details, using quality components, and tools. You might want to consider having a gunsmith inspect the throat with a borescope (just a thought). There's more than one way to get a rifle to shoot, but it always come back to consistency.

you can hit em as hard as you want, but you have to hit em first

Keep in mind the animals we shoot for food and display are not bullet proof. Contrary to popular belief, they bleed and die just like they did a hundred years ago. Being competent with a given rifle is far more important than impressive ballistics and poor shootability. High velocity misses never put a steak in the freezer.

Joe
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Paul B
Advanced Member

3324 Posts

Posted - May 24 2012 :  00:43:47  Show Profile Send Paul B a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"How much depth is usually considered necessary?"

I think I answered your question on another site but in case you mised it, seat the bullet just deep enough that the cartidge maintains it's integrity when feeding through the action. I won't be that long winded tonight as it's gettin late. I'm thinking that the 1/8" depth may not be quite enough but you can only try it to see if it works, If not, seat slightly deeper in small increments until the cartridge don't get bent or otherwise mangled.

"The point is kind of moot anyway because my little Lee Classic Loader kit doesn't have enough threads to load that long anyway."

What I would ry is back off the seating stem as far as it will go. If your die is like the Lee dies I have you can screw it all the way out if you want. Take the die body and adjust the lock ring so the die sits higher in the press. Shouldn't take a whole lot but you can play with that. Once you have the die body where you think it should be put a cartidge case in the shell hold and just barely start the seating stem. Turn it on down until it contacts the bullet and adjust it to where you want the bullet to be in the shell. That should cure that problem.
Paul B.
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Paul B
Advanced Member

3324 Posts

Posted - May 24 2012 :  00:45:04  Show Profile Send Paul B a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"How much depth is usually considered necessary?"

I think I answered your question on another site but in case you mised it, seat the bullet just deep enough that the cartidge maintains it's integrity when feeding through the action. I won't be that long winded tonight as it's gettin late. I'm thinking that the 1/8" depth may not be quite enough but you can only try it to see if it works, If not, seat slightly deeper in small increments until the cartridge don't get bent or otherwise mangled.

"The point is kind of moot anyway because my little Lee Classic Loader kit doesn't have enough threads to load that long anyway."

What I would ry is back off the seating stem as far as it will go. If your die is like the Lee dies I have you can screw it all the way out if you want. Take the die body and adjust the lock ring so the die sits higher in the press. Shouldn't take a whole lot but you can play with that. Once you have the die body where you think it should be put a cartidge case in the shell hold and just barely start the seating stem. Turn it on down until it contacts the bullet and adjust it to where you want the bullet to be in the shell. That should cure that problem. If not PM or E-mail me and I'll see what I can figure out.
Paul B.
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ranger335v
Advanced Member

1633 Posts

Posted - Jun 17 2012 :  16:00:14  Show Profile Send ranger335v a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"If your die is like the Lee dies I have..."

His Lee Classic Loader is very much different from your Lee dies.

- Common sense is an uncommon quality -
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Big 4
Average Member

USA
86 Posts

Posted - Jul 02 2012 :  13:59:32  Show Profile Send Big 4 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
You are very lucky to have that "long throated" 7x57 that seats bullet way out yonder, it is, in effect, and improved chamber without all the hoopla of a blown out shoudler..Use H414 exclusively and you can duplicate "factory 7 mag" balistics and best the .280 Rem factory stuff with your handload and do it safely. My long throated Brno gets me a safe 2916 FPS with 160 gr. Nosler partitions and I have been loading for that gun for years..You simply picked up powder capacity to about 6 to 8 grs. of H414 over book, but approach that a grain at a time as all rifles are individuals, but I have done this with half a doze 7x57s..A great caliber.
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wowlijetgold
New Member

USA
12 Posts

Posted - Jul 12 2012 :  05:00:56  Show Profile  Visit wowlijetgold's Homepage Send wowlijetgold a Private Message  Reply with Quote
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fellowing
Starting Member

Australia
2 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2013 :  05:27:36  Show Profile Send fellowing a Private Message  Reply with Quote
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Shastaboat
Advanced Member

USA
5386 Posts

Posted - Jun 07 2013 :  10:45:54  Show Profile Send Shastaboat a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I like to seat at least one caliber deep but don't always. Also I don't generally find long throats a problem in getting accuracy out of any military or similar chambered rifle, 6.5x55, 7x57, 8x57, 7.62x51 Nato, etc...With cast Rifle bullets I do like to seat bullets kissing the lands or seated into them. With my 6.5x55 Swede I only seat .200 with the bullet I shoot so that I can reach the lands. Seating a bullet without sufficient grip on the neck is not a good practice. You have to be the judge. 5/32 (.15625) may be enough if you are careful but in field conditions (off the bench) I don't think so. Even a .243 Win has enough neck to seat one caliber and so does a .223/5.56.

On another note: If you want to increase powder capacity, long throating a chamber does work to allow long seating if your rifle's magazine will take the longer cartridges. People have been long throating the .257 Roberts chambered in LA rifles for years and get results right at .257 AI rated. I know, I've done it. A throating reamer is only about $35.00 vs renting ($40-$60.00) or buying ($125.00+) AI chamber reamer.

Edited by - Shastaboat on Jun 07 2013 10:47:03
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Leatherstocking
Average Member

Canada
79 Posts

Posted - Jun 16 2013 :  19:26:17  Show Profile Send Leatherstocking a Private Message  Reply with Quote
As Shasta says, be careful that the bullet is gripped tight eneough by the neck. The risk is "bullet setback" where the recoil of a previous shot causes the bullet to set further into the case. This can leave you with a bloodied face and ruined rifle. Ten2six has a story about this.
I drill a hole in a block of wood (maybe 3/16). I test each round by sticking the bullet in the hole and pressing firmly on the bottom of the case. It must not set in further.
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Leatherstocking
Average Member

Canada
79 Posts

Posted - Jun 16 2013 :  19:43:28  Show Profile Send Leatherstocking a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thought I should add Ten's post to this string.
"I had a gun blow up in my face from a .204 bullet that got knocked back into the case as I chambered a round. The case head split in two, the bolt face stretched, I got burnt and bloody, but luckily I came away with eyes, ears, and fingers intact.

When I inspected the box of loads I was shooting, I had about 1/3 that I could push the bullets back into the case with finger pressure. I use the FCD on all my .204 loads now and I didn't see any change in accuracy, so something to consider."

ten
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